Your browser version is outdated. We recommend that you update your browser to the latest version.

The Ledger
107 S. Christian Ave.
Moundridge, Kansas 67107
(620) 345-6353


This Week's Issue:

October 19, 2017 The LedgerOctober 19, 2017 The Ledger

Vrooom! Vrooom! Miller Brings Drag Racer To IES

Posted 8/24/2017

By Randy Fogg

The Ledger StaffJO McFadden, principal at Inman Elementary School, sits in the driver’s seat of Jaron Miller’s drag-racing car. Miller brought his car to show to students and he talked about drag racing.JO McFadden, principal at Inman Elementary School, sits in the driver’s seat of Jaron Miller’s drag-racing car. Miller brought his car to show to students and he talked about drag racing.

INMAN – Chance Kaiser and Rebecca Black, sixth graders at Inman Elementary School, had both previously gone to drag racing tracks, but they experienced a drag racing car in a new way on the first day of school Thursday, Aug. 17.

Since IES is using a car racing theme this school year, Principal Jo McFadden invited Jaron Miller, of Hutchinson, to bring his drag racer to show students and talk to them about the sport.

“I’ve never been this close to a race car before,” Black said. “I have been to a drag race. They didn’t look that long.”

Miller started his car for each of the classes.

“When he started it, my stomach jumped,” Kaiser said. “It’s pretty cool.”

Black agreed, “It surprised me. I didn’t think it would be that loud.”

Kaiser said he has been involved with motocross racing. He usually rides at a track in Wichita.

He noted Miller “is really nice.”

“It’s pretty interesting,” Kaiser said of drag racing. “You don’t see many of those cars around here.”

Miller, age 26, said his wife knows McFadden and was aware she was looking for someone to bring a race car to IES for the first day of school. He agreed to come to the school.

“It’s was so exciting (to have Miller at the school),” McFadden said.

Miller started drag racing in 2005 when he was 15-years-old.

“It’s great to them interested in it,” Miller said.

He competes regularly at the Great Bend drag strip as part of the Sunflower Rod and Custom Association (SRCA) series. They started racing in April and will continue until October.

He said he considered drag racing to be hobby.

His grandfather, who was also a drag racer, got him and his brother involved with the sport. His grandfather started taking them to a track for safety considerations.

In answering students’ questions, he said the fastest his race car will go is 160-miles-an-hour and it has a 200 horsepower engine. A drag race typically covers one-quarter of a mile.

He told students the back tires on his race car need a large diameter.

“They have to be able to move the car without spinning out,” Miller said. “The front wheels don’t have to be big. They’re just for moving the car forward.”

He noted only has to change the tires every two to three years.

“Sometimes you have to change them more often,” he added. 

Miller estimated he has won 20 races has about as many trophies.

A student asked him about practicing. He explained during the winter months, he would work with a practice “tree” a couple of times a week. In drag racing, driver must watch a series of lights go on - on what is called a “tree” – to start the race.

He added he does not practice during the season.

“They’re similar,” he said of the starting mechanisms, “But each is a little different.”

Miller said he bought his blue racecar from a man in Kansas City. He noted he has a total of three drag racers.

He noted his brother and sister also drag race and his family has a total of six cars, including his.

He said his brother’s car would go up to 180 mph. He added he and his brother have split their races.

Students asked about the fuel he used in the car. He noted he must run a 114-octane fuel and he used three-quarters of a gallon during a race day. The fuel costs $15 a gallon.

A student asked Miller what does a driver do if the parachute does not open to slow down the racecar after a run. Miller said all drag tracks have a sand pit.

“You run it into the sand and you’ll stop,” he explained.

Read the rest of this entry »

Davidson New Economic Development Director At Inman

Posted 8/24/2017

By Randy Fogg

The Ledger StaffDAVIDSONDAVIDSON

INMAN – Zach Davidson has been hired as the economic development director of the City of Inman.

Lucas Sawyer - chairman for Inman Community Development, Inc.  (ICDI) – announced Davidson’s hiring to the Inman City Council during its meeting Monday, Aug. 14, at the city office.

Sawyer said Davidson grew up in Salina and was involved in economic development for Galveston County, Texas, for the last two years.

“He has some experience and is from the area,” Sawyer said. “He seemed to be a good fit for the community.”

 Read the rest of the story in the August 24, 2017 print edition of The Ledger

Read the rest of this entry »

Wilkinson: Goal Of SCKEDD Is To Provide Help

Posted 8/24/2017

By Randy Fogg

The Ledger StaffSTEVEN Wilkinson, the new executive director for the South Central Kansas Economic Development District, spoke to members of the Moundridge Chamber of Commerce during its monthly luncheon Thursday, Aug. 17, at the Moundridge Arts Council building, 118 S. Randall.STEVEN Wilkinson, the new executive director for the South Central Kansas Economic Development District, spoke to members of the Moundridge Chamber of Commerce during its monthly luncheon Thursday, Aug. 17, at the Moundridge Arts Council building, 118 S. Randall.

MOUNDRIDGE – The mission of the South Central Kansas Economic Development District (SCKEDD) has three parts – improving the economy, community infrastructure and housing.

Steven Wilkinson, the new executive director for SCKEED, talked about the organization to members of the Moundridge Chamber of Commerce during the monthly luncheon Thursday, Aug. 17, at the Moundridge Arts Council building, 118 S. Randall.

Wilkinson has been working at SCKEED for 2-and-a-half months. SCKEED covers a 14-county area, including McPherson County.

“This is my first experience in directing a non-profit,” Wilkinson said. ‘This has been a worthwhile change for me.”

Read the rest of the story in the August 24, 2017 print edition of The Ledger

Read the rest of this entry »