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The Ledger
107 S. Christian Ave.
Moundridge, Kansas 67107
(620) 345-6353


This Week's Issue:

October 19, 2017 The LedgerOctober 19, 2017 The Ledger

Children Build, Design In Kick-Off SRP Event

Posted 7/13/2017

ELLA Schrag, age 9, creates a structuring using marshmallows and pieces of dry spaghetti during the kick-off event for the Moundridge Public Library’s Summer Reading Program Friday, July 7, at the Pine Village Wellness Center.ELLA Schrag, age 9, creates a structuring using marshmallows and pieces of dry spaghetti during the kick-off event for the Moundridge Public Library’s Summer Reading Program Friday, July 7, at the Pine Village Wellness Center.By Randy Fogg

The Ledger Staff

MOUNDRIDGE – Children showed plenty of creativity skills as they were involved in several activities to learn basic engineering practices and environmental stewardship during the kick-off event for the Moundridge Public Library’s Summer Reading Program (SRP) Friday, July 7, at the Pine Village Wellness Center.

Moundridge USD 423 teachers Adam and Jill Robb led the children in the opening event. SRP is geared toward children in preschool to those completing eighth grade.

The Robbs’ program allowed children to build, create, design and explore at seven stations.

Library Director Jill Stern said there were 64 children registered for the reading program, which has the theme “Build A Better World.”

“We’re having a great time,” Stern said. “Adam is great with kids. He had an idea of what he wanted to do when he agreed to do it.”

Adam Robb stressed to the children that they should use their creativity and it was a chance to explore ideas.

“There are no right answers and that’s the cool thing,” Adam Robb told the children.

One station involved an egg drop. They had to work with a partner. They were given 20 straws, one meter of tape and an egg. The idea was to build something to protect the egg when it was dropped from a stepladder.

“Hopefully some will survive,” Adam Robb said.

Mac Unruh and Lucas Beasley worked together.

They put a couple of straws on each end of the egg and taped several straws together to attach to the egg. They wanted that end to go down first when it was dropped.

“This will allow air to go into the straw,” Beasley said. “Hopefully, it will slow it down. We will see.”

Unruh said, “I’ve done something like this before. We had a box we could put the egg in.”

The boys said they were confident their device would work.

However, none of the children were able to keep their egg from breaking.

“It was too spread out,” Beasley said.

At another station, children used marshmallows and dried pieces of spaghetti to build a tower.

“I like to build things,” Ella Schrag, age 9, said. “I’ve done it before.”

Schrag said she usually builds with Tinker Toys.

Eli Williams, age 6, went to the paper airplane station. After he completed the plane, Williams tried it out.

“Yeah, it went pretty fair,” Williams said after watching his plane travel 15 feet.

Williams said it was the first time he had made a paper airplane.

Adam Robb showed children how to make a paper helicopter, after making a couple of cuts to the paper.

Robb also dropped a couple of the paper helicopters from the stepladder after the egg drops were done. The helicopters would gently rotate down to the ground.

The other stations Robb set up were plant flowers in a plastic cup; use Play-Doh to make objects such as a snake, rosebud and rocket ship; build with super size Legos or with wooden blocks.

“You can do anything like this at home,” Robb said. “You all have the skills to make this a better world.”

The reading program will last for seven weeks.

The program will conclude at 10 a.m., Friday, Aug. 18, at the wellness center. Wichita’s Exploration Place will bring six hands-on stations for participants to experience engineering, biotech, sustainability and energy-themed activities.

 

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Inman’s E-Community Loan Program Receives $100,000

Posted 7/13/2017

RATZLAFFRATZLAFFBy Randy Fogg

The Ledger Staff

INMAN – The Inman Entrepreneurship Community loan program applied for and received an additional $100,000 to assist a local business, Inman Chamber of Commerce President Bob Ratzlaff said.

The loan program is administered through the Center for Entrepreneurship Tax Credit Program and Network Kansas.

Ratzlaff made the announcement during the Chamber meeting Friday, July 7, at the Harvest Café.

The loans were developed to be used in conjunction with financing through a local financial institution to start a business or expand an existing one.

Ratzlaff said an E-Community loan could be used to pay for 40 percent of a project, with a maximum loan of $45,000.

“It’s not based on need,” Ratzlaff said.

Originally, Inman received $127,000 for its loan program.

The Inman program has made five loans totaling $171,235. Ratzlaff said there are four outstanding loans with a balance of $114,268.12. Businesses have paid back $56,966.88 plus interest.

Ratzlaff said the loans have a variable interest rate of 2-3 percent.

“We have a good track record,” Ratzlaff said.

“We’ve never had a payment 10 days passed due,” he stressed. “We have good loans.”

The Kansas Center for Entrepreneurship Tax Credit Program created the E-Community loan program.

Ratzlaff said Network Kansas was interested in getting tax credits sold to provide more money for the statewide program.

Basically, the program allows businesses and individuals to purchase tax credits, which are dollar-for-dollar credits against state income tax liability. The program allows for a 75 percent tax credit.

For every $1,000 donated, donors will receive $750 credit directly off of their state income tax liability. If the amount of the tax credit exceeds the contributor’s liability in the taxable year, the remaining portion of the credit may be carried forward until the total amount of credit is applied.

Ratzlaff noted Network Kansas’s Erik Pedersen, vice president of entrepreneurship, was interested in visiting with local young adults – in their 20s and 30s – about leadership.

“We need to develop the next generation of leadership,” Ratzlaff said.

Ratzlaff said they would be working with Pedersen to find a date in the next couple of months for him to give a leadership program in Inman.

The Chamber talked about other issues at the meeting.

To read more, see this weeks print edition

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Children Make Teddy Bears During VBS

Posted 7/13/2017

REX Harrison works to get stuffing into his teddy bear during the Project With a Purpose time at Moundridge’s Vacation Bible School Saturday, July 10, at West Zion Mennonite Church. Children were able to keep their bears or donate them to a local emergency responders to give to a child during a crisis situation.REX Harrison works to get stuffing into his teddy bear during the Project With a Purpose time at Moundridge’s Vacation Bible School Saturday, July 10, at West Zion Mennonite Church. Children were able to keep their bears or donate them to a local emergency responders to give to a child during a crisis situation.By Randy Fogg

The Ledger Staff

MOUNDRIDGE – Peyton Neufeld admitted making a teddy bear was not easy.

She said the most difficult part of making sure the bear was full of stuffing and it was properly filled out.

“It’s really fun, but it’s difficult,” Neufeld said

Neufeld was among the 78 children attending Moundridge’s Vacation Bible School Saturday, July 10, at West Zion Mennonite Church.

Moundridge did a weekend version of VBS. The program was titled “Camp Out Getting S’more of Jesus.” Associated Ministries, formerly Associated Churches, sponsored VBS.

VBS Director Kristen Koller said the children made the teddy bears during Project With a Purpose time. Children were able to keep their bears or donate them.

Koller said the bears were donated to local first responders – police, fire and emergency medical service personnel – as well as Mercy Hospital.

“They are to give them to children they come in contact during their duties,” Koller said.  “We wanted to keep them here in town.”

After putting the stuffing in them, children were able to put bubble wrap or cellophane paper in the bear so it would make some noise. They also put a heart inside the bear. Leaders used a glue gun to seal up the bears.

Neufeld said she planned to donate her bear.

Rex Harrison said he like putting his bear together. He added he planned to keep his bear.

To read more, see this weeks print edition

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