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The Ledger
107 S. Christian Ave.
Moundridge, Kansas 67107
(620) 345-6353


This Week's Issue:

October 19, 2017 The LedgerOctober 19, 2017 The Ledger

A Second Opinion: USD 423 Asks Vogts To Look At Prices

Posted 6/22/2017

By Randy Fogg

The Ledger Staff

MOUNDRIDGE – The USD 423 Board of Education wants a second opinion on the prices Nabholz Construction gave the school district to replace and upgrade critically needed items for the three buildings the school district owns.

Opponents of the previous bond issues the district had put to a vote encouraged Superintendent George Leary  to talk to developer Al Vogts, of North Newton, about the prices. Vogts grew up in Moundridge and graduated from Moundridge High School in 1978.

“People are questioning the numbers,” Leary said. “They think they’re high. They think they’re ‘Kansas City numbers.’

“I think it’s worth pursing,” he added.

Vogts has done construction projects across the state, including several in Moundridge.

Board members reached a consensus during their regular meeting Monday, June 12, to have Vogts and his crew work with the district’s new task force to determine what they think are the district’s critical needs for Moundridge Elementary School, Greer Gymnasium and Moundridge Middle/High School.

Vogts will have three months to put together his price list.

The district will pay Vogts $18,950 for his work.

During the three-month period, the district will be putting a hold on its contracts with Nabholz and PBA Architects.

Leary said Nabholz officials have told him they want to renegotiate the company’s contract with the district since the total amount of a potential bond issue has been decreasing.

At its May meeting, the Moundridge board was given a list a committee had put together a list of critical needs, as well as a secondary list with items needed, but were not deemed critical.

Leary said he considered the lists to be “a starting point” for discussing how the district should upgrade its facilities.

The three lists come to a total of $13.3 million - $9.3 million for the middle/high school, $2.8 million for the elementary school and $1.1 million for Greer. District-wide, the less critical work totaled $2.2 million.

The two lists have a total of $15.5 million.

Board members said they wanted to make sure Vogts’ prices included any kind of markups, like the Nabholz bid. They stressed they wanted a fair comparison.

Vogts told board members he planned to use as many local sources as possible.

“I get the local part,” Board member Ryan Durst said. “I think it’s great.”

Vogts said Moundridge residents want to know they are getting value with the work being done.

Vogts stressed the district was not under any obligation to use him for any of the work.

“We’re not trying to hold you hostage,” Vogts said. “We want to help you.

“We’re trying to get a clear step to what you need to do next,” he added.

Board member Jacque Schmidt said she wanted Vogts and his workers to look at the past bond issues as well.

“If he’s going to save us all this money, can we added a few more things?,” Schmidt added. “We might as well have the additional information.”

Board members Randy Rice agreed that Vogts should consider the previous proposed work.

The board handled several other issues during the meeting:

• The early graduation requests from Sierra Diehl and Ben Schrag were approved.

• The board approved increasing the participation fee for middle school sports from $15 to $25 a sport. Each student has a cap of $50 in participation fees for the school year.

• The district will purchase 43 Dell laptop computers from Second Gear for a total cost of $22,012.83.

• Resignations from Carol Dall, food service, and Aaron Annis, custodial and head high school softball coach were accepted.

• Board members approved several new employees – Les Schrag, Patty Critchfield and Karen Brunk for summer maintenance; and Kali Jantz, food service.

• The next regular board meeting will be at 7 p.m., Monday, July 10, at the board meeting room.

 

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Games, Fireworks, Food Part of Inman’s Independence Day

Posted 6/22/2017

By Randy FoggINMAN residents were able to learn how to play human foosball during last year’s Independence Day celebration. Last year, there was one game set up for adults and another for children. Olivia Napier, who as the goalkeeper for her team, looks for a location to kick the ball. There are plans for a tournament this year.INMAN residents were able to learn how to play human foosball during last year’s Independence Day celebration. Last year, there was one game set up for adults and another for children. Olivia Napier, who as the goalkeeper for her team, looks for a location to kick the ball. There are plans for a tournament this year.

The Ledger Staff

INMAN – How many lemons can you eat?

Inman’s Independence Day celebration will include a lemon-eating contest. Games, food and fireworks will be part of the celebration, which will start at 6 p.m., Sunday, July 2, at the Inman Wellness Center parking lot.

Nick and Katy Reinecker are serving as events coordinators of the celebration for the Inman Chamber of Commerce.

Nick came up with the idea for the lemon-eating contest.

“I was in the car and was going to eat a lemon,” he said. “I broke off a piece for each of my sons. As we were eating, we were making funny faces. I thought it would make something different from a hot dog eating contest.”

The contest will start at 8 p.m. The winner will be the person who eats the most lemons in a two-minute period.

The winner will receive a year supply of lemonade as well as a lemon meringue pie.

Reineckers said many of the activities will start at 6 p.m.

Attendees will be able to get a hot dog meal for $6 a person. The menu will include hot dogs, chips, baked beans, watermelon and drink.

A human foosball tournament has been planned. Attendees were able to practice the game last year.

“I think they got to see what it’s all about,” Nick said.

Individuals will be able to form six-person teams. All members must be age 10 or older. The tournament is limited to six teams.

The registration fee is $30 per team and the deadline to register is Friday, June 30. Teams should stop by the Inman Harvest Café to register and see the full rules or they can call 620-755-1380.

A grand prize will be awarded to the winners.

Nick noted he has gotten inquires from a couple of teams interested in registering.

Old-fashioned yard games will take place.

He noted anyone wanting to learn more about human foosball, they can watch numerous videos of games on YouTube.

Fencing or wood panels are used to form the field for the game. Participants will need to hang on to plastic PVC pipes as they attempt to kick a soccer ball into the goal.

“We’d like to see a lot of people come out and take part in the games,” Katy said

Children will be able to compete in a tug-of-war contest and a bucket brigade. There will be a colored water balloon toss.

Katy said information from the manufacturer of the dye for the colored water balloons indicated the coloring will come out of most materials.

There will be a table full of prizes for the winners of the children’s games.

At dark, the fireworks show will start. The City of Inman and the Chamber split the $3,000 bill for the firework.

All of the money raised during the event will go toward more fireworks for next year.

“We’d like to upgrade the fireworks show, but we need to raise the money,” Katy said.

This is the third year for the Reineckers to coordinate the event.

“I’m thankful to the city and the chamber for allowing us to do it,” Nick said. ”Remembering all the sacrifices others made so we can celebrate is important.”

 

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Moundridge Police: Keep Homes, Cars Locked

Posted 6/22/2017

By Randy FoggSCOTT Zimmerman, with the Moundridge Police Department, gave crime prevention tips to members of the Moundridge Chamber of Commerce during the Chamber luncheon Thursday, June 15, at Quincy’s Bar and Grill.SCOTT Zimmerman, with the Moundridge Police Department, gave crime prevention tips to members of the Moundridge Chamber of Commerce during the Chamber luncheon Thursday, June 15, at Quincy’s Bar and Grill.

The Ledger Staff

MOUNDRIDGE – Police Chief Jay Kessler had a simply message for people attending a community meeting Thursday, June 15, at the Pine Village Wellness Center.

“The main theme we wanted people to get from the meeting is to lock the doors to their vehicles and to lock the doors and windows to their homes,” Kessler said.

Officer Scott Zimmerman delivered a similar message to members of the Moundridge Chamber of Commerce during the Chamber Luncheon that same day, at Quincy’s Bar and Grill.

“If the door is locked, a lot of burglars do not want to spend the time to knock down the door or break a window,” Kessler said. “They will move on to another house.”

Kessler said there were mainly Pine Village residents attending the meeting at Pine Village. The severe storm moving through Moundridge in the early evening hours probably kept many people at home, he said.

Kessler said he would like to schedule a second community meeting in a month or two in an effort to get the information out to more residents. He said the date and time for the meeting will be announced at a later date.

In his presentation to the Chamber, Zimmerman said the city was fortunate to have two exits off the interstate. While it is good for the community, Zimmerman said it does not promote safety.

He stressed residents are “going to know their neighborhoods better then anyone else.”

If something seems out of place, residents should be willing to call police and let them know about it, Zimmerman added.

He said there are things homeowners can do to help police. He suggested putting landscaping floodlights 2 ½ to 3 feet away from the home. With that distance, burglars might walk in between the floodlights and the home.

Zimmerman said people should write down the serial numbers of valuable items, including guns. Residents should also keep photographs of the items, including expensive jewelry.

To read more see, this weeks print edition

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